Ninja Resources Page

 

FAQ Section

What do I need to set up the course?

2 strong trees at least 25' apart and at least 1' in diameter (or 3' around). The 65' kit works for trees up to about 55' apart (depending on tree diameter), and the 50' kit works for trees up to about 40' apart (depending on diameter).

You'll probably also need a ladder or step stool. Please be careful and follow good safety practices.

Can I use a fence post or part of my house?

No. We only recommend using good strong healthy trees greater than 1' in diameter. Slacklines in general require sturdy trees because of the very high forces in the system. The line must be ratcheted tight prior to use, and once in use additional forces are experienced due to the users weight. These forces can be thousands of pounds.

Please ensure the safety and suitability for your specific setup and situation. If in doubt, please contact a licensed local professional to assess with you on site.

Why does the line sag?

The line sags for a couple reasons: the polyester material it's made from can inherently stretch, and when a person's weight is on the line they exert a surprisingly high tension force into the line easily over 1000 pounds.

If your line sags too much, you should first tighten the line as much as you can. If it still sags too much, you'll need to raise the line higher on the trees to get proper ground clearance.

How tight should the line be?

It should be as tight as you can crank the ratchet. All the components are made strong enough to handle the high line tension. To help get the line tight, it's important to pull it as tight as you can prior to cranking the ratchet. This usually requires 2 people; 1 to pull the line tight and 1 to crank the ratchet. If the line isn't pulled tight prior to cranking the ratchet, the ratchet spool can fill and prevent further tightening.

How high should the line be?

The line height should be set so that the shortest user's feet hang 12" from the ground while hanging from the monkey bars or gymnast rings.

To determine the height of course add the values below:

- Measure shortest user from feet to fingertip with hand held high.

- Add 24 inches to account for the monkey bar rope length and ground clearance.

- Use the chart below to estimate the amount of sag for the smallest user.

- For example, your shortest user is 66 inches from feet to fingertip, add 24 inches, and you determine the sag to be about 12 inches (50 pound user with trees 50 feet apart), the height of the line should be 102 inches (66” + 24” + 12” = 102”) from the ground.

As shown in the chart below, the farther apart the anchor trees are, the more the course line will sag. This is normal, but should be taken into account when setting the line height. Also shown in the chart below, heavier users will experience more sag.

The line height may need to be adjusted for best user experience. Feel free to adjust to a height you feel is safe for your users and your situation.

For families with a range of user sizes, it's a trade-off. The taller and heavier users need the line set higher so they don't touch the ground, but smaller and lighter users need it set lower so they can reach the line and drop safely.

If feet are touching the ground during use then you probably need to move the line up higher and tighten it more. It should be as tight as you can crank the ratchet. All the components are made strong enough to handle the high line tension.

How far apart should the obstacles be?

A good starting distance between obstacles for a younger kid is around 12". Since our attachments are adjustable you can fine tune this to any distance you like. As kids get better or bigger, you can widen the distance to increase the difficulty.

How do I adjust the location of the attachment hooks?

To rearrange the obstacles, simply open the triangle carabiner screw gate, remove the obstacle and place it in a different carabiner. This can be done without releasing the line tension of the course.

To move the carabiners/hooks and change the distance between obstacles, the line tension must first be released. Once tension is released, you can simply slide the carabiner/hook to the location you want.

Can I get more obstacles or attachment hardware?

We don't offer add-on obstacles at this time, but we do have hardware kits available on our website. Each hardware kit includes 1 custom webbing hook and 1 triangle carabiner.

Please check out this link: https://www.fofana.co/collections/fofana-ninja/products/ninja-hardware-set The attachment hardware is available in sets of 1 or 5.

Something is wrong with the kit I received.

Please contact us at support@fofana.co and we'll be glad to help ASAP.

When should the ninja course be taken down? How long can I leave it set up?

To help keep your ninja course in good condition and to help it last, we recommend the following:

Take it down when not in use for long periods of time. This will help prevent UV damage and weathering of the line, and unsupervised use.

Take it down and store it at the end of the play season or when temperatures drop below freezing. Inspect each component for wear, damage, or rust. Replace as needed.

Store it in the carry bag so everything is ready for the next time you set it up.

Why is the course so difficult?

This is meant to be a physically challenging obstacle course. It's made for kids ages 6+. Kids on the low end of this range may use it mostly for climbing and swinging and maybe can do a couple obstacles in a row. If kids making some progress across the course, that's great! More time practicing and training will help them improve. As kids improve, it's fun to see their confidence grow.

How should I arrange the obstacles?

One of the fun parts about this course is the ability to create your own course design and arrange the obstacles anyway you want.

For beginners, we suggest placing the ladder at one end and use it to climb up to the height of the obstacles. Next, find which obstacles your kid has the most success with and place those first near the ladder. This will make getting started easier. Then add the obstacles in order of difficulty so the most challenging one is at the end. This should help ease the frustration of not passing a difficult obstacle right at the beginning. 

Make sure that each obstacle is easily within reach from the previous one. A good starting distance between obstacles for a younger kid is around 12". Since our attachments are adjustable you can fine tune this to any distance you like. As kids get better or bigger, you can widen the distance to increase the difficulty.